Biquinho, White

Biquinho, White

Capsicum chinense

White Biquinho peppers
White Biquinho

Background

This is a white variant of a Brazilian pepper, which is typically red in color.

Notes

The review pod is one I grew, but the seeds were from Jim Morrow.

The amount ate: 2 pods
Heat: 2
Flavor: 6
Burn Profile: Mostly tongue burn
Effects: none
Cap Cramps: none

Review

The pods are seedy and juicy, and semi-translucent. They had a slight ‘habby’ smell and flavor, but the base flavor had a dull sweetness.

Video

Pepper grow update #15

You’ll probably notice, I got the date wrong at the beginning, a few have pointed it out. I said it was August 6th but actually recorded it on September 5th, 2020.

Helper form for Pex Peppers Taco Fuego hot sauce recipe

Back in February 2020, Pex Peppers shared a few of their recipes online. This is the Taco Fuego recipe ingredients list. I made a form that will derive the grams of ingredients and estimated number of bottles needed, based on the grams of peppers used.

From Pex Peppers: Please note, the vinegar used in these recipes is DISTILLED WHITE VINEGAR unless otherwise specified. Weights are in Grams. To make these sauces, put ingredients in a pot, bring to a boil for 10 minutes and then blend via immersion blender. Bottle them at least at 190 degrees F and flip them onto their lids for at least 60 seconds for proper sterilization.

Taco Fuego Hot Sauce (Pex Peppers Base Recipe)

Ingredient Weight
Roasted RED Jalapenos 4550 Gr
Vinegar 3400 Gr
Chipotle Powder 140 Gr
Garlic 135 Gr
Cumin 75 Gr
Salt 50 Gr

KAOS

KAOS

KAOS
KAOS peppers


Capsicum chinense

Background

The KAOS is a pepper cross from Jeanie Yanger. I don’t know the specifics, but I suspect some Bhut in the mix.

Notes

The review pod is one I grew, but the seeds were from a pod saved from Justin White.

The amount ate: 1/4 pod
Heat: 7
Flavor: 7
Burn Profile: Mouth, ears, back of the throat
Effects: none
Cap Cramps: none

Review

This was grown from seeds saved out of a pod from Justin White. The pods are red and smallish, with horizontal wrinkling, similar to what is seen on the ‘Jami’ bhut variants, and some Peach Bhuts. It had a Bhut-like smell. The flavor was sweet without an upfront burn. The burn had a gradual buildup and became pretty intense. The flavor reminded me of Bih Jolokia, but sweeter and with more heat.

Video

Peach hot sauce recipe

Peach hot sauce
Peach hot sauce

It’s kind of a Caribbean style fruity hot sauce using fresh ripe peaches and yellow/orange habanero heat level peppers.

I just made this using fresh peaches from the produce stand and peppers I just picked, a mix of Khang Starr Lemon Starrburst, KhangSta Yellow, Peach Chupetino, White Biqunho, Faria crosses and a *few Peach BaneStrain. The majority though was the KS Lemon StarrBurst.

Fresh peaches
Fresh peaches
Peppers
Sliced mixed peppers
Other ingredients
Other ingredients
pH
pH

Ingredients list:

  • 8 cups – fresh sliced peaches (or canned in water/juice) ~around 8 peaches
  • 9 1/4 cups  – Sliced fresh (or frozen) peppers around habanero level heat, preferably yellow/orange color. Examples, habaneros, scotch bonnets, datil, etc…
  • 4 cups  – Apple cider vinegar **
  • 3/4 cup – White wine vinegar **
  • 1 1/4 cup – Cane sugar
  • 3/4 cup – Water
  • 3 Tbsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp – Xantham gum (optional) *

* These will help with emulsifying the sauce so it says in solution longer. Otherwise, you might have to shake the bottle a little more often. It’s not a big deal though.

** The sauce comes out a little vinegar forward. The pH is low enough, you could back down the vinegar a little if desired, and still be safe. Something like 3.5 cups acv, .5 cup white wine vinegar would be fine.

This should yield around 13 x 5oz bottles worth.

Directions:

  1. Sterilize the bottles beforehand by boiling in water for 20 minutes. I’ll spray the caps inside and out with Star San (diluted to proper strength), and rinse with water, but vinegar also works. You don’t want to boil the caps.  Also, I discard the flow reducers if the bottles come with them. Or save for later, if you make a really watery sauce and need them.
  2. Combine ingredients in a blender. Add the liquid ingredients first, then salt, sugar, and xantham gum. Add the peaches and peppers last. I use four or five blending jars and split them up, blending each one and dumping into a 6 qt pot. If the sauce is super thick, add more water, 1/2 cup at a time until you get a better consistency. It should be medium, not super thick or super runny. You might have to repeat after the following step.
  3. Bring to a boil for 10 minutes, then blend with an immersion blender. Bring back to a boil to at least 190 degrees.
  4. Fill the sterilized bottles with the hot sauce, cap, and flip for at least 60 seconds each for proper sterilization.

Equipment needed:
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  • Large Blender – You can use something large and expensive like a Vitamix (honestly if I had one I’d use it). I use the Bella Rocket Extract Pro Power Blender. I had one previously that lasted several years before it died, and I use the extra containers from the first one. It’s relatively inexpensive and, in my opinion, works well. Unfortunately at the time of this article, I can’t find it to link to. It’s possible it was discontinued or out of stock. A comparable blender would be this NutriBullet. But you might want some extra cups.
  • Immersion/Stick blender – I use this one by Cuisinart.
  • Stainless steel 6-quart  saucepan – Mine is from a Cuisinart set I’ve had for years.
  • 5 oz woozy bottles – I use these sauce bottles from Amazon.
  • Stainless steel funnel – These are the best funnels for filling sauce bottles.
  • Ladle – I use something like this, but any kind that works at high temps is fine.
  • Jar lifter – I use one like this, that came with an older canning kit. You’ll need this to remove the bottles from the hot water.
  • Canning pot for boiling the sauce bottles. I use this pressure canner but as a hot water bath, without pressurization. I use this one because it has a flat bottom and works best with my stove. Any large pot will do though, or something like the traditional canner pots. If you use a regular pot, you’ll need a canning rack in the bottom to protect the bottles.
  • Measuring cups – Any kind will do.
  • Star San – If using to sterilize the caps before bottling.

Pepper grow updates

Here are the last two pepper grow updates for the past month. The plants are a little set back from early-season issues, but I think they are doing well now.