Sansi 35 watt LED grow test – 7 week followup

Although Sansi gave me this light for free to try, my review is honest and unbiased.

Also, I get commissions for purchases made through links in this post. This is at no extra cost to you and helps support my site and YouTube channel.

Follow-up

This is a follow-up to the initial setup and testing of the Sansi 35 watt BR30 LED. See original article here.

I’m surprised how well this light is doing for growing. It is not designed to be used as a grow light but does a decent job of it. I’m getting lots of nice roots and leaf development, and even fruit! See the video below to see the progress.

Video

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Sansi LED Floodlight test

Sansi LED Floodlight
Sansi LED Floodlight

Although Sansi gave me this light for free to try, my review is honest and unbiased.

Also, I get commissions for purchases made through links in this post. This is at no extra cost to you and helps support my site and YouTube channel.

Sansi LED Floodlight

Sansi sent me their 50 watt LED floodlight for evaluation. This light isn’t designed for growing purposes, but I am testing it for growing.

Although marketed as 50 watts, actual power draw was less than that, around 40 watts. It has 3500 lumens and color temp is 5700K. The PAR readings I took show a really high level very close to the light but dissipates quickly over a few inches distance.

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Basics of a drip irrigation system

I get commissions for purchases made through links in this post. This is at no extra cost to you and helps support my site and YouTube channel.

If you’ve never used or set up a drip irrigation system before, it can seem intimidating. The best thing to do starting out is first to decide what you will be growing, how many plants, and where the system will reside. Then look at a drip irrigation kit that approximates your needs. Get a kit that has slightly more than what you need. You can buy under need, and supplement with additional parts too, but often it is cheaper to just buy a slightly larger kit.

I highly recommend Drip Depot.  Not only do they have any and every kind of drip irrigation system you could need, but their staff is very knowledgeable and helpful, to answer any questions you might have. I am an affiliate of there’s, but also a customer. I would recommend them regardless.

You can run a drip system with our without a fertilizer injector. If you don’t use a fertilizer injector, some type of supplemental plant food is necessary, such as slow release Osmocote 14-14-14, or other amendments. A fertilizer injector has many benefits, including precise control over the rate of release, and ability to stop and start feeding easily. The downsides are added complexity and cost.

The basic components of a drip irrigation system are the following in order, from the faucet:

  1. Timer (optional) – this is to turn the system on and off. I use the Claber Video 2-cycle water timer.
  2. Backflow preventer
  3. Inline filter
  4. Pressure reducer
  5. Fertilizer injector (optional)
  6. Mainline 1/2″
  7. Drip line – 1/4″
  8. Drip emitters

You’ll also need connectors for each mainline, and drip lines, These will all be included in a kit.

If you cost compare, you’ll see it’s much cheaper to purchase a drip irrigation kit starting out.

Videos

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New Sansi 35 watt LED – Can it be used for growing?

Sansi 35W BR30 bulb
Sansi 35W BR30

Although Sansi gave me this light for free to try, my review is honest and unbiased.

Also, I get commissions for purchases made through links in this post. This is at no extra cost to you and helps support my site and YouTube channel.

The Sansi 35 watt LED light bulb is a new product from Sansi. It isn’t advertised as a grow light but has all the right specs to be considered useful as one. It produces 3500 lumens in the 5000K color spectrum. It screws into a standard light socket with the E26 base. The lights are focused at a 120-degree angle. The CRI is 80.

Bench tests

Sansi sent me one of these to try myself and I got the following results when testing.

Actual power draw measured with my Kill-a-watt tester  31 watts.

PPFD measured with the Hydrofarm PAR meter

  • 20″ – 75
  • 12″ – 300
  • 6″ – 900

Video

This shows the unboxing and initial tests, and setup.

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30-day update on Sansi led grow light comparison

Although Sansi gave me these lights for free to try, my review is honest and unbiased.

Also, I get commissions for purchases made through links in this post. This is at no extra cost to you and helps support my site and YouTube channel.

Sansi grow light comparison
Sansi grow light comparison

I ran the 15-watt and 30-watt Sansi LEDs for 30 days and recorded a time-lapse. The 15-watt light seemed to perform much better than the 30 watt version (actual 23 watts). I think it’s because the LEDs on the 15-watt light are more focused, whereas the ones on the larger version are diffused.

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Sansi 15w and 30w grow light test

Sansi 15w and 30w grow lights side view.
Sansi 15w and 30w grow lights.
Sansi 15w and 30w grow lights top view
Sansi 15w and 30w grow lights

Although Sansi gave me this light for free to try, my review is honest and unbiased.

Also, I get commissions for purchases made through links in this post. This is at no extra cost to you and helps support my site and YouTube channel.

Sansi sent me one each of their 15w and 30w mixed full spectrum grow lights. These lights appear white when on, instead of purple. I tested the power draw and PAR readings of each one. They are currently offering a 20% discount using the code LIKEASUN. The offer is good through 5/31/18. These can be purchased at Amazon.

SANSI LED Full Cycle Grow Light, 15w Full Spectrum Ceramic LED

SANSI 30W Daylight LED Plant Light Bulb, Full Spectrum Ceramic LED

Power

I plugged these into my kill a watt tester. The 15w pulled 15.3 watts. The 30w only pulled 23.7 watts.

PAR readings

At 12″, both lights were around 260-270μmol/m2/s. At half that distance the 30w model was a little stronger than the 15w at 1100 μmol/m2/s and 1000 μmol/m2/s respectively. The light spread on the 15w model is more focused and defined. Whereas the light from the 30w is more diffused.

Grow test

I have the lights setup over established Holy Basil plants. The nutrients I am using are Masterblend, Epsom Salt, and Calcium nitrate. The strength is around 650 ppm/1.3 EC. The pH is 6.3.

Video 1:

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Apera Instruments AI209 PH20 Value Waterproof pH Pocket Tester

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Apera Instruments pH tester
Apera Instruments pH tester

I bought an Apera instruments PH20 pocket meter to replace my Bluelab pH pen. So far it seems very accurate and easy to use. Calibration is simple. It comes with a carrying case and the 7.0 and 4.0 calibration solutions.

Available here: https://goo.gl/2JdWB8

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What I’m working on, new low-pressure aeroponic system

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Update on a new low-pressure aeroponic system I’m working on. This one will support multiple containers, and reservoir fed. The controller bucket will maintain the nutrient level and house the pump that will power the sprayers.

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Here are the parts I’m using so far to build this:

Reservoir fed, float valve controlled Kratky-like growing system

I get commissions for purchases made through links in this post. This is at no extra cost to you and helps support my site and YouTube channel.

Holy Basil in float valve setup
Holy Basil in float value setup
Float valve
Float valve

I set this up recently for growing my Holy Basil that I started in the water bottle, germinating/sprouting chambers.

Most people use a controller bucket between the reservoir and growing containers. This is what contains the float valve to maintain a static level of the nutrient solution.

In my design, I used a 10-gallon shallow tote and installed the float valve on one side of it. I hot-glued a plastic canvas barrier to keep the roots from interfering with the float valve. The hot glue is not holding very well. One of my viewers wisely suggested using silicone instead. So I might redo that at some point.

I filled the tote so the bottoms of the net cups are submerged by about 1/4″. The roots will grow downward and eventually drain the tote until it gets near the bottom. From that point, the float valve will maintain the solution level about 2.5 inches in depth.

Here’s the video. I’ll post updates on the progress.

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Parts used:

Float valve: https://goo.gl/79NbT3
Masterblend nutrients: https://goo.gl/dstJ1v
5-gallon bucket for the reservoir
shallow 10-gallon tote – I got this one from Lowes
Kingbo50W: https://goo.gl/VCBo6X
Light hanger: https://goo.gl/LNFZwA
2×2 grow tent: https://goo.gl/AmgqqF